ROOMSTORE NEWS

TOM DIXON

SUBSTANTIAL IN WEIGHT, SMOOTH IN TEXTURE AND BOLD IN PATTERN

Swirl from Tom Dixon was presented at Maison & Objet in Paris. It is a series of geometric forms stacked upon one another to create multi-dimensional, functional sculptures. The unique process involves recycling the powdered residue from the marble industry, mixed with pigment and resin to create blocks of material that can then be sawn, sliced and turned on a lathe.

Substantial in weight, smooth in texture and bold in pattern, Swirl will inject a fresh pop sensibility into any setting. Swirl is a family of candleholders, bookends and vases, each with their own distinct silhouette, colouration and personality.

BRAND NEW BEADS
FROM TONONE

The new series Beads from Tonone was launched at the Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair. The lightweight beads is completely made out of aluminium materials. The smart, compact and minimalistic LED armature is designed for multiple uses. The 360 degrees light range makes this lamp useful in various situations.

Tonone was founded in 2013 by Anton de Groof and is based in The Netherlands. The Tonone design team works together with local craftsman to produce their products. Each step in the process of designing and producing is done with care and an eye for each detail.

Tonone stands for bold, functional and no-nonsense products with an industrial character. The design team’s vision is that traditional craft tools and mechanics can be a visual, as well as a functional basis for innovative product design.

TONONE

DAVID TRUBRIDGE

MARU

PRESENTING THE NEW MARU

Maru is the newest concept luminaire from the David Trubridge studio and is made from 60 identical components that clip together to create an elliptical form.

The name Maru is found in both New Zealand Maori and Japanese languages, with references to the cycle of life.

Maru is available for sale in two sizes.

DAVID TRUBRIDGE

MAGIS

THE STORY OF AN UNCONVENTIONAL PROJECT

When creativity is put into motion and combined with research, the consequences can be truly surprising. This is the case with Spun.

In the video below, Thomas Heatherwick talks about how this iconic rotating chair came about. It is manufactured by Magis using rotational-moulded polypropylene. When researching symmetrical geometric shapes that rotate, a question came to mind: could any of these become a chair? In order to find the answer, it was necessary to break with the stereotypes of what a chair is; a back, seat, and legs, going in a new direction and reworking shapes and materials, testing again and again to then return to the essence of the idea and, finally, the prototype to be presented to Magis.

The result? Just look at the amused, carefree air of those who sit on the Spun chair to understand how beautiful things are sometimes surprising, even for those who create them.

Find more information about the Spun Chair here.

MAGIS